Parliamentary Motions - Ballot Samples

Motions are typically run as an impromptu vote. Some planning goes into a motion, but that planning is performed by the mover of the motion (i.e., the person suggesting the motion), and the motion only becomes a topic for consideration if someone seconds the motion (the seconder). Therefore, other members and organization leaders may not know what the motion is before it is suggested and seconded, which results in the requirement to vote on other actions including Secondary Motions and Bring Back Motions.

Main Motion

Voters vote for or against the main motion; eg, a resolution.

Motions are extremely common in formal meeting procedures and are a fundamental part of parliamentary procedures. For example, taking a recess during a parliamentary proceeding is initiated by calling a motion to take that recess.  The format of the ballot is simple, with a simple “In favor” or “Opposed”, with the winning threshold determined as a majority using Plurality Voting.

Secondary Motion

Voters vote for or against a Secondary Motion; for example, an amendment, or an adjournment.

This is similar to the main motion in format.  However, organizations have varied requirements for the threshold as to whether a Secondary Motion is approved or disapproved. Commonly, it is either a simple majority or a two-thirds majority using Plurality Voting.

Bring Back Motion

Voters vote for or against a motion to bring back a question before the assembly; eg, to reconsider the question.

This is similar to the Main Motion in format but is less commonly used as it is a very formal method of conducting business during a meeting.  The threshold for acceptance is similar to the Bring Back motion, either a simple majority or a two-thirds majority using Plurality Voting.

Try creating a Parliamentary Motion now!

Start For Free
© 2022 ElectionBuddy, Inc. All Rights Reserved
hello world!
chevron-down